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Entertainment History’ Category

August 7 – Life’s a Beach Party

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August 7 – Life’s...

1963 - August 7 The film, Beach Party with Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, opens in American theatres. Music is provided by Dick Dale And The Del Tones. The first of the five official American-International "Beach Party" movies. Anthropology Professor Robert Orwell Sutwell and his secretary Marianne are studying the sex habits of teenagers. The surfing teens led by Frankie and Dee Dee don't have much sex but they sing, battle the motorcycle rats and mice led by Eric Von Zipper and dance to Dick Dale and the Del Tones.

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July 31 – You’ve Got A Friend

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July 31 – You’ve...

1971 - July 31 James Taylor scored his only Billboard number one record with the Carole King written, "You've Got A Friend". The song would go on to win the 1971 Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male. Joni Mitchell sang background harmonies with Taylor. Taylor made some minor lyric changes at the risk of upsetting Carole King. However, the truth was revealed, when Carole first heard James' version, while he was performing it live at the very same theater where he was introduced to the song 2 years earlier in 1969. The story goes that Taylor was scheduled to perform at the Troubadour Theater in Los Angeles, and while tuning up for his evening performance in the dressing room, he heard Carole King's lovely voice, and the beautiful piano music of this song gently wafting from the stage through the dressing room doors. When they met backstage, James told Carole that he ...

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July 24 – Like a Rolling Stone

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July 24 – Like a Rolling...

1964 - July 24 A riot broke out during a The Rolling Stones' gig at The Empress Ballroom in Blackpool, Lancashire. Keith Richards noticed a man with his hands on the stage exhorting the crowd to spit, and warned him, but the spitting continued. Richards is then reported to have stood on his hands and kicked him in the face, whereupon some of the 7000 fans in attendance started fighting, causing over 4,000 Pounds in damage. Blackpool City Council later voted to ban The Stones from playing in the city. 44 years later, the 2008 council voted to lift the ban, but a spokesman for the group said they had no plans to return. Keith Richards: Blackpool "We'd walk into some of those places (we were playing) and it was like they had the Battle of Crimea going on, people gasping, tits hanging out, chicks choking, nurses running round with ambulances. I know ...

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July 17 – Hardest working man in music

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July 17 – Hardest...

1965 - July 17 King Records releases "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" by James Brown. It would go on to sell over 2 million copies and receive the Grammy Award for best R&B recording.

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July 10 – Like a ‘Rolling Stones”

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July 10 – Like a ‘...

1965 - July 10 The Rolling Stones classic rocker "Satisfaction" was number one in the US on both the Cashbox and Billboard charts. In 2004 Rolling Stone magazine placed "Satisfaction" in the number two spot on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and in 2006 it was added to the Library of Congress National Recording Registry, despite its sexually suggestive lyrics.  The Stones performed "Satisfaction" on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1966. The line "Trying to make some girl" was bleeped out by censors. Otis Redding recorded this in 1966 at the behest of Steve Cropper and Booker T. Jones, who were part of his backing band at Stax Record. Otis hadn't heard the song, and he didn't like it, so he did a radically different version of the song, using horns and changing many of the words. Using horns was what Keith Richards originally had in mind ...

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JUNE 30 – Can’t kill Rock n Roll

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JUNE 30 – Can’t...

1956 - June 30 A concert by Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers and Bill Haley & His Comets at the Asbury Park Convention Hall in New Jersey ended, prematurely, when a fistfight in the audience erupted into a full-scale riot. Three people were stabbed and then-Mayor Roland J. Hines threatened a city-wide ban on rock and roll performances. The ban never came to pass. In the mid-1960s, promoter Moe Septee started booking rock acts at Convention Hall, including some bands who would go on to achieve legendary status. Between 1965 and 1975, Septee booked Black Sabbath, The Beach Boys, James Brown, The Byrds, Ray Charles, The Dave Clark Five, The Doors, The J. Geils Band, Herman’s Hermits, Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, KISS, The Rolling Stones, The Temptations, Pink Floyd and The Who, among many others.[13] Led Zeppelin played Convention Hall the evening of August 16, 1969, after their manager, Peter Grant, rejected an ...

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June 23 – Smokey Robinson & The Miracles

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June 23 – Smokey...

1965 - June 23 Motown Records releases "Tracks Of My Tears" by Smokey Robinson And The Miracles. The song was written by the group, based on a riff that Miracles guitarist Marv Tarplin had come up with. Their version would reach number 16 on the US Pop charts, while Johnny Rivers' rendition would reach number 10 two years later. 1972 - June 23 Smokey Robinson appears in concert for the last time with The Miracles, in Washington, DC.

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June 16 – Monterey Pop Festival

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June 16 – Monterey Pop...

1967 - June 16 Over 200,000 people attended the first Monterey Pop Festival this week in 1967. Many of the leading Rock acts of the time appeared, including Otis Redding, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Simon and Garfunkel, Canned Heat, The Mamas and The Papas, The Grateful Dead, Eric Burdon and The Animals, The Association, Booker T. and The MGs, The Who, Jefferson Airplane, The Byrds, David Crosby and Steve Miller. John Phillips of The Mamas and The Papas would later write, "San Francisco" (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair) about the festival, which became a big hit for Scott McKenzie later in the year.

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June 9 – Purple People Eating

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June 9 – Purple People...

1958 - June 9 Sheb Wooley hit the top of the Billboard chart with a novelty song called "The Purple People Eater". When he first sang the tune for MGM executives, Sheb said he was scraping "the bottom of the barrel", but the brass loved the song and wanted to release it. Three weeks after it hit store shelves it was the number one record in the US and would start a merchandising craze that included hats, T-shirts and even ice cream. The voice of the purple people eater is a sped-up recording, giving it a voice similar to, but not quite as high-pitched or as fast, as Ross Bagdasarian's "Witch Doctor", another hit from earlier in 1958; and "The Chipmunk Song" which was released late in 1958. (The Chipmunks themselves eventually covered "Purple People Eater" for their 1998 album The A-Files: Alien Songs.) The sound of a toy saxophone was produced ...

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June 2 – Not quite Ziggy Stardust yet

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June 2 – Not quite Ziggy...

1967 - June 2 David Bowie released his first album, which contained the single, "Love You 'Til Tuesday". Although the LP got positive reviews, neither it or the single sold well. The self-titled album was released on Deram Records. Its content bears little overt resemblance to the type of music that later made him famous, such as the folk rock of "Space Oddity" or the glam of The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. NME critics Roy Carr and Charles Shaar Murray have said, "a listener strictly accustomed to David Bowie in his assorted '70s guises would probably find this debut album either shocking or else simply quaint", while biographer David Buckley describes its status in the Bowie discography as "the vinyl equivalent of the madwoman in the attic". David Bowie's influences at this stage of his career included the theatrical tunes of Anthony Newley, music hall ...

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